If you are planning an extended cruise or ocean passage, it is vital that should give thought to packing a grab bag for immediate emergency use – but what should you actually be packing? 

A grab bag should contain emergency items that, should the worst occur and you have to abandon your vessel, will assist in getting you rescued and help you to survive in your liferaft until you are rescued.

If you do not have a liferaft, then your chances of surviving may be significantly lower depending on the location, the weather conditions and the water temperature. Each manufacturer will include different equipment within a liferaft and this should be considered when you decide what to pack in your grab bag. Liferafts built and certified to ISO 9650 are packed with equipment according to the time likely to be spent on board before rescue. The list is comprehensive and certain items that have a shelf-life may be carried separately in a grab bag.

All grab bags should be stowed in an easily accessible location. The grab bag should be brightly coloured and able to float for 30 min in the water when fully packed. The grab bag should have a means of attaching it to an inflated raft.

It is worth preparing a list of the things you will need to put in a grab bag- assuming there is time – in priority order. The Royal Ocean Racing Club specifies a number of items in its Special Regulations for offshore racing which a useful place to start. The goal should be to ensure you are rescued having spent the shortest possible time in the liferaft. The order of priority is therefore:

  • Items that will indicate you are in distress and assist with your rescue, if you cannot do this then no one is going to look for you
  • Items for survival whilst waiting for rescue

Each liferaft, dependent on make and model, will have differing additional items included so it is important to check what may already be packed.

There are a variety of items you could pack which will indicate you are in distress and can attract attention: EPIRB/PLB, flares, EVDS, a waterproof handheld VHF, a powerful waterproof torch, spare batteries, a strobe light, a whistle and a satellite phone are all useful. A handheld GPS will help you to keep track of your movements in the liferaft.

You must also think about your needs for survival. The basic requirements are high energy food and water (a hand operated water maker may be useful). But you may need a spare pair of spectacles, warm and waterproof clothing, sun glasses, sun protection, lip salve, medication and antibiotics, seasickness tablets and a basic fishing kit. You should also collect together vital personal items that you will need once rescued, such as a passport, credit cards, keys, mobile phone, money, ship’s papers and insurance documents.

To find out more about how to keep yourself and everyone on-board safe whilst on the water, visit the Safe Boating hub.

Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde
LNTM NO 10/20
LOCH LONG – DEPLOYMENT OF SEABED CURRENT METER
BA Chart 3746

1. Mariners are advised that Loch Long Salmon Ltd has contracted Partrac Ltd. to deploy one seabed mooring frame containing an acoustic measuring device for period of 90 days, the position given below in Table 1 and Figure 3. This is to measure the water column tidal current profile throughout this period.

2.The seabed frame is 1.5 x 1.5m and will be 0.8m proud of the seabed (Figure1). The location will be marked by a 75cm diameter yellow riser buoy (Figure 2)

3. The measurement device is scheduled to be deployed week commencing 15th June 2020 and by the 22nd June. The works will be completed using the vessel Mary M (Figure 4) supplied and operated by GSS Marine Ltd.

Figure 1. Example Seabed Frame Figure 2. Marker Buoy

4. Mariners are requested to keep a distance of 250m away from the surface marker buoy, through this period.

Figure 3: Deployment location of Current Meter Buoy Loch Long

Figure 4: Mary M (GSS)

5. Further notice will be given when the current meter has been recovered following the 90 day monitoring period.

6. Further Information can be obtained from QHM Harbour Control on VHF CH73 or 01436 674321 Ext 3555/4005.

7. Next CWM 11/20.

Tuesday 16 Jun 2020

David Lightfoot OBE MSM AFNI
Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde

Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde
LOCH LONG – CONSTRUCTION OF AIDS TO NAVIGATION BEACONS
LNTM No 09/20
                                                                                                                                                                                            BA Chart 3746

1. Mariners are advised that the first of two phases to construct 4 Aids to Navigation (AtoN) Beacons in Loch Long will commence on the 1st June 2020 lasting for approximately 4 weeks. The AtoN Beacons are being installed to effectively guide vessels to and from the new Glen Mallan Jetty following its construction.

2.Volkerstevin have been contracted to undertake the works which will include piling, marine construction and diving. Vessels will include crane barges, jack-up barge, supply barges, multi-cat work boats and a safety boat. All vessels associated with the works will display appropriate signals as required by the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea. The following vessels will be used to carry out the marine operations:

 

Marine Vessel Particulars – ConstructionWorks
Type Owner Name Size (m) RegistrationNumber
CraneBarges LandfallBV NP549 60 x22 N/A
Jack-up Barge Combi Float C-726 31 X 20 N/A
SupplyBarges LandfallBV Lastdrager 7 50 x14 N/A
Multicats GSS MarineServices MeganM 24 x8.54 IMO6515473
AileenM 25 x9.9 IMO9570888
 

 

 

Safety Boat/ CrewTransfer

 

 

 

Commercial RibCharter

 

 

 

Lodestar

 

 

 

11 x3.3m

 

 

 

HINPLTME39001C909

 

3. Phase 1 of the works will be the installation of 4 piles for each AtoN Beacon to +4.0m above Chart Datum (CD), each pile being marked with a flashing yellow navigational light with the character Fl(2) 6s at +5.0m above CD. Following completion of phase 1 the piles will remain in this temporary condition until phase 2 in September 2020 at which point the top sections of the beacons and the sectored lights will be installed completing the works. A separate LNTM will be issued nearer the time giving details of the beacon commissioning process, and the change over of the Cnap Pt Lt headmark’

4. Please see below co-ordinate table and chart extracts of each AtoN Beacon in the order in which they will be installed:

 

 AtoN  Latitude  Longitude
 Mallan No 3  56 7.522635N 04 49.223771W
 Mallan No 1  56 6.800018N 04 51.098485W
(Approach headmark) ‘Cnap Point Lt’  56 7.375280N 04 50.193924W
 Mallan No 2  56 7.199451N 04 49.583375W

Extracts from BA Chart 3746 showing the AtoN positions

 

5. Whilst the vessels are operational in the associated areas, they will maintain a listening watch on VHF Channels 12,16 and 73.

6. Mariners are to navigate with caution when transiting in this area and reduce wash adjacent to the works. MOD Police will monitor activity in the area.

7. Further notice will be given when phase 1 is complete.

8. Further Information can be obtained from QHM Harbour Control on VHF CH73 or 01436 674321 Ext 3555/4005.

9. Next CWM 10/20.

See charts on this link:-

View notice online

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Simply put, a liferaft may well be your salvation should the unthinkable happen so put some thought into where and how to stow it.

If you do not have a liferaft, in extreme circumstances you may simply have to take your chances in the water; the chances of a person surviving in the water compared to being in a liferaft are significantly lower and your survival time will vary depending on the location, the time of year, the weather conditions and the water temperature.

It is not mandatory for private pleasure craft under 13.7 metres in length to carry a liferaft, but when deciding whether or not to do so your proximity to other boats and emergency services who can render assistance if you need to abandon ship, should be taken into consideration.

Your liferaft must be capable of being launched quickly and easily in an emergency. It is critical that it is stowed correctly otherwise it might not be accessible if it is needed. There is no single best solution, but good practice dictates that wherever that is, it should be capable of being launched in 15 seconds.

If you normally keep your liferaft in a locker, possibly to prevent theft, then make sure it is not covered in clutter that you have to remove first to get to it. Better still, move it to a more accessible position particularly when making offshore plans. If it’s stored on deck it needs to be somewhere that does not risk accidental deployment in heavy weather or get damaged from being stepped on or sat on.

Think what would happen if you capsized – could you get to your liferaft? It is becoming more common for liferafts to be mounted on the coachroof or aft of the cockpit with a hydrostatic release unit (HRU). However these only release at about three metres below the surface and that might not be deep enough for an inverted boat. Even if the HRU is triggered the liferaft may well not float free if not stowed properly.

If you intend to use an HRU, make sure that you follow the manufacturer’s instructions to ensure that it will function properly. You should also make sure that you can launch your liferaft manually – a Senhouse slip/Pelican hook is ideal. If you have to take to the liferaft there is no point in being in the water hoping for the liferaft to float free. The HRU should be viewed as a last resort rather than the primary means of deploying the liferaft.

Don’t overlook where you stow your liferaft, it should be an important part of any offshore passage preparation and not an afterthought.

Visit the RYA’s online safety hub at www.rya.org.uk/go/safety or a wealth of practical advice and safety ‘top tips’ covering a vast array of boating activities – and look out for the Safety Advisory videos on the RYA’s digital channels on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn.

QUEEN’S HARBOUR MASTER CLYDE
Faslane North Basin Procedures

DIRECTION No 16/20

References:
A. International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 1972 – Rule 34e
1. Mariners are advised that the Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde has made the following General Direction under the Clyde Dockyard Port of Gareloch and Loch Long Order 2011.
Faslane North Basin Entry Procedures
2. The following procedures are to be adhered to:
1. Vessels requiring to enter the North Basin should call QHM Harbour Control (Call Sign “FOSNI Ops” – out of hours) on VHF CH 73 to request clearance prior to entering the basin; for vessels in passage from Perch Rock or the southern Gareloch, the call should be made abeam the Harbour Operations building. For vessels proceeding from the north Gareloch, the call should be made in good time prior to basin entry; vessels should not proceed into the basin until clearance is obtained.
2. At the point of providing clearance, QHM Harbour Control will pass any information regarding other activities in the North Basin which require particular awareness.
3. If the calling vessel receives no response on VHF, telephone contact should be attempted on 01436 677280 or base x3555 (Base ext 4005 out of hours)
4. Vessels wishing to depart the North Basin should call for clearance to sail as in current practice.
5. Vessels departing the basin should have priority over vessels entering unless there are extenuating circumstances and as directed by harbour control
Sound Signals
3. All vessels of Police Patrol Boat size and above are to use appropriate sound signals when entering and leaving the North Basin, that is, the sounding of one prolonged blast to warn of their approach.
4. This General Direction will be reviewed by 10 Jan 21.
Queen’s Harbour Master
Renown Building
HM Naval Base, Clyde.

View notice online

Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde

LNTM NO 05/20

LOCH LONG – GLEN MALLAN JETTY CONSTRUCTION WORKS

                                                BA Chart 3746

1. Mariners are advised that the existing jetty and infrastructure at Glenmallan in Loch Long is approaching the end of its design life. Volkerstevin have been contracted to undertake the demolition of the existing jetty and approaches and to construct a new suspended deck jetty in its place. The works will commence on Tuesday 27th August 2019 and will last until 2nd February 2021.

2. Works will include piling, marine construction and diving. Vessels will include crane barges, supply barges, multi-cat work boats and a safety boat. All vessels associated with the works will display appropriate signals as required by the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea.

3. An exclusion zone will be in place for the duration of the works, marking the Marine Works Area of Operation. This is to facilitate the mooring of barges and anchor locations from winch wires on the crane barges. Due to the depth of water at the project location it is envisaged that the crane barge winch wires will extend 250-300m from the crane barge installation locations. Below British Admiralty Chart 3746 extract shows the exclusion which will be in force for the duration of the works.

4. Whilst the vessels remain within the operational and associated areas, they will maintain a listening watch on VHF Channels 12,16 and 73.

5. Mariners are to keep clear of the exclusion zone and reduce wash adjacent to the works. MOD Police will monitor activity in the area.

6. Further Information can be obtained from QHM Harbour Control On VHF CH73 or 01436 674321 Ext 3555/4005.

7. Next CWM 06/20.

The following vessels will be used to carry out the marine operations:-

Crane Barge NP 549

CW – 6 Rock Barge

 GSS Multicat Aileen

GSS Multicat Megan M

Safety Boat CRC Lodestar

View notice online:-

https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/QHM/Clyde/Local-notices/LNTM/2020/CWM-05-20

Tuesday 07 Jan 2020

David Lightfoot OBE MSM AFNI
Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde

Marine radio distress relay protocol

RYA issues guidance for marine radio users.

Following consultation with the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) and the Association of Marine Electronic and Radio Colleges (AMERC), the RYA has issued revised guidance regarding the procedure for sending a ‘Distress Relay’.

In a relay situation, there is no longer a requirement to send a DSC ‘Urgency Announcement’.  The ‘Mayday Relay’ voice call remains unchanged and should still be transmitted as normal.

If a distress is received by DSC or voice, the skipper of a vessel should act as follows:

  1. Wait five minutes for the distress to be acknowledged by the Coastguard or another vessel.
  2. If no acknowledgement or distress working is heard, send a ‘Received Mayday’ voice call to the station in distress, then:
  3. Relay the distress message to the nearest Coastguard, which may be by any means, but should primarily be sent using a ‘Mayday Relay’ voice call addressed to the specific Coastguard station followed by repetition of the original ‘Mayday message’.
  4. The Coastguard should respond and take over distress working and co-ordinate the assistance.
  5. If unable to contact a Coastguard station, send a ‘Mayday Relay’ call, addressed to ‘All Stations’, followed by the repetition of the original ‘Mayday message’. You should then prepare to co-ordinate the assistance to the vessel in distress between yourself and any other vessels in the vicinity.

The same approach, starting at step 3, should be taken if you believe another vessel, aircraft, person or vehicle is in distress and unable to transmit its own distress signal.

Be prepared

If you have a VHF radio on board your boat, or carry a handheld VHF whilst out on the water, you need to hold an operator’s licence.

The RYA Marine Radio Short Range Certificate (SRC) course is a one-day course aimed at anyone who wants to operate a marine VHF radio, with or without Digital Selective Calling (DSC).

Vital for days out boating, it covers radio functionality, how to relay information clearly and swiftly in an emergency situation, as well as hands-on practice of operating and talking over the radio.  Supporting information, including the simplified distress relay protocol, can also be found in the RYA VHF Handbook (G31).

Find out more about RYA training courses at www.rya.org.uk/training, or visit www.rya.org.uk/shop to browse the full selection of RYA publications.

Visit the RYA online safety hub for information and advice about safe boating.

QUEEN’S HARBOUR MASTER CLYDE
RAVENROCK SECTOR LIGHT RE-LIT – LOCH LONG

LNTM No 19/19

BA Chart 3746
1. Mariners are advised that Ravenrock point sector light in position 56 02.14N, 04 54.37W has now been re-lit.
2. CWM 18/19 is now cancelled.
3. Further information can be obtained from QHM Harbour Control on VHF CH 73 or 01436 674321 ext. 3555/4005.
4. Next CWM 20/19

View notice online

Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde
LNTM NO 18/19
RAVENROCK SECTOR LIGHT EXTINGUISHED – LOCH LONG
BA Chart 3746 (Close to Ardentinny)

1. Mariners are advised that Ravenrock point sector light in position 56 02.14N, 04 54.37W is currently extinguished.

2. Mariners are advised to navigate with caution when transiting in the area.

3. Notice will be provided when the light has been restored.

4. Further information can be obtained from QHM Harbour Control on VHF CH 73 or 01436 674321 ext. 3555/4005.

5. Next CWM 19/19

Wednesday 23 Oct 2019

David Lightfoot OBE MSM AFNI
Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde