Find out how the new rules will affect you.
Safety 22 Oct 21
Car towing boat
The Department for Transport (DfT) has this week announced that as from the 15 November 2021 new rules will be introduced for towing a trailer with a car.

The effect of the new rules however, will be dependent on when the driver originally passed their car driving test. If you passed your car driving test from 01 January 1997 onwards, you will be allowed to tow trailers up to 3,500kg Maximum Authorised Mass (MAM) from 15 November 2021.

If you qualify under the new rules, then the DVLA will update your driving licence record automatically to show that you are allowed to tow trailers. You will get category BE added to your driving licence when you get a new photocard driving licence. This will happen automatically, and you do not need to contact DVLA for this to happen.

Until the law changes on 15 November 2021, you must continue to follow the current rules about what you are allowed to tow based on when you passed your car driving test.

Previously, those wishing to tow a trailer would have had to pass a car and trailer test to tow a larger trailer. Car and trailer driving tests have now been stopped by the DVLA. If you had a test booked for yourself, then DfT have confirmed that the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency will have automatically cancelled and refunded it for you.

Different rules remain applicable for towing a trailer in Northern Ireland.

You can find further information about the new rule on the GOV.UK website.

Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde
LOCH GOIL – ESTABLISHMENT & DISCONTINUATION OF QINETIQ TRAFFIC SIGNALS
LNTM No 23/21
British Admiralty Chart 3746

1. Mariners are advised of the establish of two sets of occasional traffic signals which replace the flagstaff at Carrick Castle which is now discontinued, all within Loch Goil. Please  see below details:

Establishment:

Location description      :           Loch Goil. Maytime Barge. Traffic Signal (Occas).

Latitude                              :           56 09.449’         North (WGS-84 datum)

Longitude                           :           004 54.049’       West (WGS-84 datum)

Character                           :            3FR(vert) (Occas)

Range                                  :            12 miles

Structure                            :             Metal post on static moored Signal Raft

Height above MHWS      :            2.6 metres

Height of Structure        :             2 metres

Establishment:

Location description       :            Loch Goil. Signal Raft. Traffic Signal (Occas).

Latitude                               :            56 08.454’         North (WGS-84 datum)

Longitude                           :            004 53.637’       West (WGS-84 datum)

Character                           :             3FR(vert) (Occas)

Range                                  :             12 miles

Structure                            :             Metal post on static moored Signal Raft

Height above MHWS      :             2.6 metres

Height of Structure         :            2 metres

These lights are only illuminated when naval vessels are carrying out trials within the Loch Goil Experimental Area. Vessels wishing to navigate are to contact the QinetiQ Facility Control Room on Tel no: 01301 703474 or VHF Channel 69 (Call Sign X Ray Alpha) when the lights are on.

Discontinuation:

Location description       :             Loch Goil. Carrick Castle. Flagstaff (Occas).

Latitude                              :             56 06.53’           North (WGS-84 datum)

Longitude                          :             004 54.34’         West (WGS-84 datum)

Structure                            :             Flagstaff and occasional Red Flag

2. The associated British Admiralty Charts and Publications will now be updated to reflect these changes.

3. Further Information can be obtained from QHM Harbour Control on VHF CH73 or 01436 674321 Ext 3555/4005.

4. Next CWM 24/21.

View notice online

Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde
LOCH GOIL – LNTM 17 21 CANCELLED
LNTM No 22/21
BA Chart 3746

1. Mariners are advised that Installation work for subsea cables in Loch Goil is now complete.

2. LNTM 17 21 is now cancelled.

3. This LNTM is self-cancelling.

7. Further Information can be obtained from QHM Harbour Control on VHF CH73 or 01436 674321 Ext 3555/4005.

8. Next CWM 23 21

 

 

View notice online

Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde
LOCH LONG – ESTABLISHMENT OF GLENMALLAN JETTY NAVIGATION LIGHTS AND CLOSURE SIGNALS
LNTM No 21/21
British Admiralty Chart 3746

1. Mariners are advised of the establishment of Glenmallan Jetty Navigation Lights and Closure Signals in Loch Long, this change comes into force with a immediate effect, please see below details:

ESTABLISHMENT OF GLENMALLAN JETTY NAVIGATION LIGHTS AND CLOSURE SIGNALS

Location description : Loch Long. Glenmallan South Dolphin.

Latitude : 56 07.753’ North (WGS-84 datum)

Longitude : 004 49.130’ West (WGS-84 datum)

Character : Fl G 5s

Range : 5 nautical miles

Structure : Metal Post, 5 metres in height

Height above MHWS : 7.2 metres

IALA Category : Category 2

Comments : Not shown when Port Closure signal in use

 

Location description : Loch Long. South Port Closure Signal (Glenmallan Restricted Area).

Latitude : 56 07.753’ North (WGS-84 datum)

Longitude : 004 49.130’ West (WGS-84 datum)

Character : 3 FR (vert) (Occas)

Range : 10 nautical miles (night); 1 nautical mile (day)

Structure : Metal Post, 5 metres in height

Height above MHWS : 8.7 metres (top light)

IALA Category : Category 3

Comments : 1.5 metres apart (on South Dolphin), Restricted Area closed

when lights on

 

Location description : Loch Long. Glenmallan Jetty South.

Latitude : 56 07.794’ North (WGS-84 datum)

Longitude : 004 49.125’ West (WGS-84 datum)

Character : 2 FG(vert)

Range : 5 nautical miles

Structure : Metal Post, 6 metres in height

Height above MHWS : 9.7 metres (top light)

IALA Category : Category 2

Comments : 2 metres apart

 

Location description : Loch Long. Glenmallan Jetty North.

Latitude : 56 07.863’ North (WGS-84 datum)

Longitude : 004 49.101’ West (WGS-84 datum)

Character : 2 FG(vert)

Range : 5 nautical miles

Structure : Metal Post, 6 metres in height

Height above MHWS : 9.7 metres (top light)

IALA Category : Category 2

Comments : 2 metres apart

 

Location description : Loch Long. Glenmallan North Dolphin.

Latitude : 56 07.941’ North (WGS-84 datum)

Longitude : 004 49.069’ West (WGS-84 datum)

Character : Fl G 5s

Range : 5 nautical miles

Structure : Metal Post, 5 metres in height

Height above MHWS : 7.2 metres

IALA Category : Category 2

Comments : Not shown when Port Closure signal in use

 

Location description : Loch Long. North Port Closure Signal (Glenmallan Restricted Area).

Latitude : 56 07.941’ North (WGS-84 datum)

Longitude : 004 49.069’ West (WGS-84 datum)

Character : 3 FR (vert) (Occas)

Range : 10 nautical miles (night); 1 nautical mile (day)

Structure : Metal Post, 5 metres in height

Height above MHWS : 8.7 metres (top light)

IALA Category : Category 3

Comments : 1.5 metres apart (on North Dolphin), Restricted Area closed

when lights on.

 

2. The associated British Admiralty Charts and Publications will be updated to reflect these changes.

3. Further Information can be obtained from QHM Harbour Control on VHF CH73 or 01436 674321 Ext 3555/4005.

4. Next CWM 22/21.

View notice online

Please sign the Petition by 31st October 2021 – Thank you!

Calling on the Scottish Parliament to urge the Scottish Government to recognize the crisis at the Rest and Be Thankful as an emergency due to the economic and environmental impacts, and high risk of 100k of debris ready to fall which is a risk to life. Deliver a robust 2-way temporary alternative to the A83 by 2022 – the current mitigation works of planting trees and digging pits does not stop landslides or stop the road from being closed every time it rains. Stop wasting time on lengthy consultation and deliver a permanent solution by 2023.

Previous action taken

The ‘Crisis at The Rest’ Campaign Group has engaged with local councillors and MSPs to raise valuable support. This lead to a meeting with Transport Scotland and the Minister for Transport, Graeme Dey, who will not alter their current plans to continue closing when it rains, without a suitable temporary solution, and will not rethink the lengthy project to decide on a permanent solution.

Background information

The A83 from Tarbet to the Rest and Be Thankful provides essential road access to and from Argyll. Landslides and subsequent road closures are not a new problem here. Ten years ago the Scottish Government set out option for a permanent solution, yet since then over £80million of taxpayers money has been wasted on temporary mitigation.

The road is used by 1.3 million vehicles annually yet was closed for 200 days last year, creating an unnecessary barrier to our region.

Furthermore, we know that 100,000 tonnes of debris is ready to fall. This is a risk to life and should therefore be treated as an emergency and addressed with the urgency that it deserves, yet Transport Scotland are now proposing a further 10 years to deliver a permanent solution.

 

Thanks to your support this petition has a chance at winning! We only need more signatures to reach the next goal – can you help?

Take the next step!

Top Tips from The Green Blue

How you choose to anchor your boat during a break from exploring can have a huge impact on the condition of the seabed you leave behind. Here are The Green Blue’s top five tips for environmentally friendly anchoring…

Do your research

Before your voyage find out if there are any protected seabed habitats where you’re intending to anchor. If possible, use an existing mooring. You can search for protected seabed habitats by visiting the ‘Anchoring with Care’ page on The Green Blue’s website.

Use the right anchor

When an anchor is lowered it becomes embedded in the seabed and can be dragged by the tide, uprooting plants in the seabed. Choosing the correct anchor for the type of seabed can help minimise drag. Even if you think the anchor is holding well, check it periodically to ensure it’s not dragging. If it is, raise it and re-anchor.

Don’t use too much chain

Flake out the correct amount of chain (four times the maximum depth at high water, or six times the maximum depth if using a chain and warp) to keep the length of chain to a minimum and minimise abrasion on the seabed.

Look for clear ground

When anchoring, try to target bare sand away from seagrass beds. Also consider the pivot area of your anchor chain to ensure it’s clear of the protected habitat. Check the anchor occasionally to make sure it hasn’t moved.

Avoid dragging the anchor

When leaving an anchoring site, pull the chain in slowly and by moving your bow over the anchor. Use a trip line to help pull up the anchor. If the boat is pulling back from the anchor, you may need to slowly motor towards it as the crew raise it.

Learn more about responsible anchoring

Download The Green Guide to Anchoring and Moorings, produced by The Green Blue or request a hard copy by emailing info@thegreenblue.org.uk

The RYA has outlined its plans for the recreational boating sector to reach zero carbon emissions by 2050.

The RYA is excited to launch ‘Pathways to Zero: The RYA’s Vision for a Zero Carbon Recreational Boating Sector by 2050.’ It is an ambitious document and outlines the key actions and milestones that will need to be reached by the RYA and the wider sector to achieve the vision for zero-carbon in response to the climate emergency.

The report has been developed to deliver on the requirement within the RYA’s Sustainability Strategy, launched last year, to set out an achievable pathway for the wider recreational boating sector to significantly lower emissions.

The report includes over one hundred individual actions, many of which are related to policy, logistics and behaviour change, and can be achieved at minimal cost. The report also contains recommendations for broad technology changes which will require funding by the sector, with Government support, over the coming years.

Commenting on the launch of the Pathways to Zero report, Phil Horton, RYA Environment and Sustainability Manager, said: “The development of this report follows wide research across the sector, analysis of sustainability forecasts, as well as speaking with RYA members and marine businesses. In addition to addressing our own operational impacts, we believe that it is essential to the safeguarding of our sport that the RYA contributes to mitigating the long-term environmental impacts of recreational boating. Addressing these concerns will have many benefits for boaters that go beyond carbon emission reductions, such as reduced noise, better manoeuvrability and response, reduced maintenance costs, and zero pollution.

“The report outlines the key areas where we have identified a need for change, many of those actions included will be relatively easy fixes. However, other actions will require investment, whether that be in time or funding.

“The RYA interacts directly and indirectly with an estimated 250,000 recreational boaters each year, therefore one of our objectives is for the changes in behaviour occurring within the RYA to be shared and adopted by those boaters and the wider boating community.”

The full Pathways to Zero: The RYA’s Vision for a Zero Carbon Recreational Boating Sector by 2050 report and its associated background paper are available to download now from the RYA website.

The RYA has outlined its plans for the recreational boating sector to reach zero carbon emissions by 2050.

The RYA is excited to launch ‘Pathways to Zero: The RYA’s Vision for a Zero Carbon Recreational Boating Sector by 2050.’ It is an ambitious document and outlines the key actions and milestones that will need to be reached by the RYA and the wider sector to achieve the vision for zero-carbon in response to the climate emergency.

The report has been developed to deliver on the requirement within the RYA’s Sustainability Strategy, launched last year, to set out an achievable pathway for the wider recreational boating sector to significantly lower emissions.

The report includes over one hundred individual actions, many of which are related to policy, logistics and behaviour change, and can be achieved at minimal cost. The report also contains recommendations for broad technology changes which will require funding by the sector, with Government support, over the coming years.

Commenting on the launch of the Pathways to Zero report, Phil Horton, RYA Environment and Sustainability Manager, said: “The development of this report follows wide research across the sector, analysis of sustainability forecasts, as well as speaking with RYA members and marine businesses. In addition to addressing our own operational impacts, we believe that it is essential to the safeguarding of our sport that the RYA contributes to mitigating the long-term environmental impacts of recreational boating. Addressing these concerns will have many benefits for boaters that go beyond carbon emission reductions, such as reduced noise, better manoeuvrability and response, reduced maintenance costs, and zero pollution.

“The report outlines the key areas where we have identified a need for change, many of those actions included will be relatively easy fixes. However, other actions will require investment, whether that be in time or funding.

“The RYA interacts directly and indirectly with an estimated 250,000 recreational boaters each year, therefore one of our objectives is for the changes in behaviour occurring within the RYA to be shared and adopted by those boaters and the wider boating community.”

The full Pathways to Zero: The RYA’s Vision for a Zero Carbon Recreational Boating Sector by 2050 report and its associated background paper are available to download now from the RYA website.

Speed limits

Within the limits of the Rhu Narrows Restricted Channel; the Faslane Restricted Area; the Coulport Restricted Area and the Coulport Fishing Exclusion Zone, the speed of any vessel shall not exceed seven knots through the water unless a speed in excess of seven knots is essential for the safety of navigation.

Elsewhere within the dockyard port, no vessel shall exceed 12 knots through the water that includes Loch Goil and Loch Long south to a line between Cove and Blairmore..

Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde

LNTM No 17/21

BA Chart 3746

1. Mariners are advised that Installation work for subsea cables is scheduled to commence on Monday 16th August 2021 for a period of approximately to 2 months.

2. The cables will be installed in the area in the chartlet below:

3. Gareloch Support Service (GSS) workboats Aileen M, Laura M and NP470 Barge will carry out this installation work. The Aileen M will be used to tow the NP470 Barge.

Please see below vessel images:

Aileen M

Laura M

NP470 Barge

4. The works will also involve diving. Flag A “diving operations” will be displayed at all times when divers are in the water.

5. Whilst the vessels remain within the operational area and associated areas, they will maintain a listening watch on VHF Channels 12,16 and 73

6. All vessels navigating in the vicinity of the cable installation works are to do so with caution and regulate their speed to minimise the effects of wash.

7. Further Information can be obtained from QHM Harbour Control on VHF CH73 or 01436 674321 Ext 3555/4005.

8. Next CWM 18 21

 

 

Thursday 12 Aug 2021

David Lightfoot OBE MSM AFNI
Queen’s Harbour Master Clyde