The Carrick Castle Boat Club has negotiated discounts with the following suppliers that range up to 20% off normal prices. There are three categories – ‘Discounts at Shop or Store’; ‘Discounts by Telephone only’ and ‘Discounts at Shop or Office or by Telephone’. The list is alphabetical by category. Members must present valid membership cards when buying in person or state your name and Carrick Castle Boat Club when ordering by telephone.

Discounts at Shop or Store

CHANDLERY

Duncan Yacht Chandlers Ltd,
7 Scotland Street,
Glasgow,
G5 8NL
0141 429 6044
www.duncanyacht.co.uk
10% discount on any item not already discounted on production of valid club membership card.

Gael Force Marine,
Units 16/18 Earl Haig Road,
Hillington,
Glasgow, G52 4JU
0141 941 1211
www.gaelforcemarine.co.uk
10% discount on any item not already discounted on production of valid club membership card or Gael Force Marine card supplied to members.

Discounts at Shop or Office or by Telephone

CHANDLERY

Silvers Marine UK Ltd.,
Silverhills,
Rosneath,
G84 0RW
01436 831222
www.silversmarine.co.uk
10% discount on any item not already discounted on production of valid club membership card or by giving your name and club by telephone.

MARINE SURVEYS

 

Colin Jones
Caledonian Marine Surveys Ltd
2 Scott Avenue
Polmont
Falkirk
FK2 0PN
01324 714778
07795201750
www.caledonianmarinesurveys.co.uk
10% discount on pre-purchase marine surveys on production of valid club membership card or by giving your name and club by telephone.

 

STORAGE & HOISTING

 

 

Silvers Marine UK Ltd.,
Silverhills,
Rosneath,
G84 0RW
01436 831222
www.silversmarine.co.uk
10% discount on production of valid club membership card or by giving your name and club by telephone.

ANTI FOULING SUPPLIES

Anti Fouling Direct,
Silvers Marine UK Ltd.,
Silverhills,
Rosneath,
G84 0RW
0844 686 1870
www.antifoulingdirect.com
5% discount on any item not already discounted by giving your name and club by telephone only.

MARINE EQUIPMENT & SPARES

A.S.A.P. Supplies Ltd.,
Reed House,
Ellough Industrial Estate,
Beccles,
Suffolk,
NR34 7TD
08451 300870
www.asap-supplies.com
0 – 20% discount on any item not already discounted by giving your name and club by telephone only.

MARINA VISITS

Holy Loch Marina,
Rankin’s Brae,
Sandbank,
Dunoon,
Argyll,
PA23 8FE
01369 701800
www.holylochmarina.co.uk
Pay for one night and get the second night half price.
This is for one visit per month per boat and must be booked in advance by giving your name and club by telephone only.

Pointers on what to look for in terms of basic wear and tear on your rig.

For any sailor, the integrity of your rig is absolutely fundamental to your peace of mind. If you are at all worried, then every single creak and groan as you put the boat under pressure becomes a cause for concern.

That’s why it’s so important to take the time to thoroughly go over your rig

“There are a number of tell-tale signs of wear and tear you can look for straight away and you can also carry out a number of maintenance jobs which will help prolong the life of your rig, however if your rig has serious faults then you will need to get an expert in to have a look at it”, comments Vaughan Marsh, RYA Chief Instructor Sail Cruising.

Here are just a few pointers on what to look for in terms of basic wear and tear on your rig:

Basic checklist

You can find out a lot by getting up the mainmast in a bosun’s chair and having a close look. Take a digital camera with you have one to record any marks or damage, to assist with asking for advice or for future reference. Starting at the top of the mast, here are a few classic things to look for:

  1. Check the nav light attachment and any other light fittings, make sure they are still firmly secured; also check the quality of the light fitting. Crazing on the plastic will significantly affect the quality of the light.
  2. Check the top of the furling gear, if you have had a halyard wrap, look out for the ‘pigtail effect’ whereby the wire halyard has started to unwind and breakdown or excessive chafe on a rope halyard.In extreme cases the forestay can also be damaged. Check all sheaves are running freely and in good working order. If there is too much sideways or vertical play in a sheave, then it’s time to look at replacing it. If sheaves are not running freely, they may simply require some silicon spray.
  3. Check all ropes for signs of fraying, there is no harm in swapping ropes ‘end for end’; leading the worn top end back to the cockpit and using the less worn end at the top of the mast.
  4. Check the mainsail track looking for excessive wear, loose fasteners and loose joints in the track. Many masts have damaged track where the headboard car sits whilst sailing.Inspect the whole of the mast including the sheave boxes for signs of cracking
  5. Check all shackles and pins to ensure they are tight and in good condition, make sure they are wired or cable tied to prevent them coming loose.
  6. Check all wire terminal backing plates for splits. Depending on your level of knowledge, you might need to check with an expert if you are unsure.
  7. Check for missing or loose rivets, if there is any play in them, they need to be drilled out and replaced.
  8. Check your radar mounting (if you have one); this is vulnerable to breaking as it is heavy and prone to getting swiped by the jib.
  9. Also to be checked is the security of the spreaders, both the inboard ends that are attached to the mast and the outboard ends that the rigging passes through or is attached to.If you have spreader end protectors on the tips, take them off and inspect for corrosion underneath. If you don’t have protectors, it’s well worth fitting them to protect the sail.
  10. Check the sail entry gate: If the mainsail slides have been falling out over the course of the season then the pin or stop is missing, which is simple to replace.
  11. Run your hands carefully along wire rigging, any bumps or broken strands mean the rigging is damaged and will need to be replaced.
  12. If your mast is keel stepped, check the drain holes in the mast are clear. Salt water sitting in the bottom of your mast is a breeding ground for corrosion.

Boom Checklist

There are three clear points of weakness on a boom: The gooseneck, vang and mainsheet. These are going to be put under a lot of strain while out sailing, so it’s essential that they are firmly attached.

  1. Check for any signs of stress cracks or excessive wearing.
  2. Make sure that the gooseneck toggle has a washer above and below where it fits into the bracket and perhaps the boom.
  3. Ensure all the sheaves are running freely.

These are just a few basic checks, but they are well worth carrying out if you want to have some peace of mind out at sea. If you aren’t confident in your rig, it’s very difficult to enjoy a good sail. Remember; if it doesn’t look right it probably isn’t!

For more top rigging tips pick up a copy of the RYA Rigging Handbook for Cruisers by Allan Barwell.

250 boats, 1,900 participants and thousands of spectators make Commonwealth Flotilla a resounding success.

People across Glasgow and west Scotland turned out in their thousands to welcome the RYA Scotland Commonwealth Flotilla, which took place on Saturday 26 July 2014.

The Royal Yachting Association Scotland, which organised the 19 nautical mile journey from James Watt Dock in Greenock to Pacific Quay, Glasgow, estimated around ten thousand spectators attended both of its official spectator sites at the Beacon Arts Centre and the Riverside Museum. Many more lined the route up the River Clyde to catch a glimpse of the 250-strong fleet.

In addition, RYA Scotland confirmed that over 1,900 sailors took part in the Commonwealth Flotilla, the largest assembly of boats in the history of the Clyde.

Click on this link for the video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THTufUvWqbQ&feature=player_embedded

Another link from Scottish Canals website – http://www.scottishcanals.co.uk/media-centre/photo-gallery/the-commonwealth-flotilla-sets-sail (The fourth photo in the series shows Dream Weaver to the right on the inside of the raft of yachts)

The flotilla was headed by the CalMac ferry, Lochinvar, a diesel electric hybrid. Other boats taking part ranged from small family cruising yachts to more traditional working boats including the VIC32 “Clyde puffer”.

James Stuart, CEO of RYA Scotland said: “We are amazed and absolutely thrilled at the success of the Commonwealth Flotilla. We wanted to inject some colour into the Clyde for one weekend in what is probably the most important fortnight in Glasgow’s recent history. We got the sense in the days leading up to the event that this was going to be a big event but the response that we got from spectators throughout the day has been incredible, and totally beyond our expectations.

“Speaking to people just after we arrived at Pacific Quay in Glasgow, we really got a sense of the interest and excitement people had in watching this historic event and we want to thank the people of Glasgow and Inverclyde and beyond who turned out to make this such a perfect day.”

To accommodate the number of boats and participants, RYA Scotland built a pop-up marina in Glasgow city centre, utilising over 1km of pontoons and around 100 volunteers.

Once settled in Pacific Quay the flotilla also enjoyed a royal visit as HRH Prince Edward, The Earl of Wessex, spent time meeting and greeting many of the participants in a pontoon walk.

A whole host of stories and photographs from the event can be found on the event Facebook page and Twitter account @Flotilla2014

You can also read more about the event at www.flotilla2014.org.uk where there is a full list of boats that took part and a selection of stories about specific boats who participated in the event.

Behind the scenes – How it all came together

Find out what it took to put on the biggest flotilla Glasgow has ever seen.

Click on this link for the video –  https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=nGIuEW3TNvw&list=UUSza01OoHbrx9x40fVK1xgA

A further Update from the RYA on 13th August 2014

“A lasting image of the Commonwealth Games will be the flotilla of hundreds of ships which sailed into Glasgow at the weekend.” STV

We all did it. We created history on the 26th July 2014 as the largest flotilla of boats ever to head up the Clyde. It was a special sight, became the top story UK wide on the BBC for a large part of the day and STV got it right, it has become an enduring image of the XXth Commonwealth Games. Thank you for helping to make it possible.

Without your enthusiasm, patience, good humour and skill at the helm the event would never have gone as well as it did. I am hugely grateful and incredibly proud to have been associated with such a fantastic event.

The event aimed to be a spectacle. It also aimed to kick off a conversation about the waters that surround us, and the fact they are not used as much as they could or should be. It seems to have had some effect already. There is talk of revisiting the development of the Clyde to ensure that the waterway can be more than just a backdrop to the fantastic city of Glasgow. The event is however the beginning of our project to see all of our waters all around Scotland used more often. They belong to us all and should be used by us all.

The next part of this conversation needs your help. Please talk about the sailing and boating you do with as many people as you can. Share your pictures on line, send us notes and articles about the boating you do, in fact please do anything you think will work to draw attention to the excitement and opportunity being on the water gives. This is a big project with a big aim and we need as many people to champion our amazing sport as we can. Join in our part of the conversation on twitter (@RYAScotland), Facebook (search RYA Scotland) and on our web pages.

Thank you again for all of your help to make the Flotilla and the first step of our big boating conversation such a success! See you all out on the water.

James

RYA Scotland Chief Executive Officer

So what next?

If you loved being part of the RYA Scotland Commonwealth Flotilla and are not an RYA member yet then why not join today? You can join online and individual membership is as little as £43 PER YEAR for an adult. There are lots of member benefits which can save you money, including at least a 20% discount on SLAM UK kit who providing the volunteer clothing for the flotilla. The RYA have a fantastic team of people on hand to give you legal advice, talk to you about training and have a great range of publications to support you in the boating you do. Above all you will be adding your support to RYA and RYA Scotland, without which we couldn’t run event such as the flotilla. If you are already an RYA member then thank you for your continued support. If you would like to join then visit:https://www.rya.org.uk/joinrenew/Pages/JoinRenewForm.aspx

Dates for your diary…

If you have been inspired by the Commonwealth Flotilla and are looking for another event to get involved with to help showcase boating in Scotland then why not have a look at the Forth Bridges Festival Flotilla? RYA Scotland are thankfully not organising this one (we are still recovering from our own Commonwealth Flotilla!) but we would love to see it be a fantastic success with lots of boats taking part. It takes place on 7th September so you haven’t got long to register your boat but if you can then please do get involved. Not got a boat? Don’t worry, there are still opportunities for you to purchase tickets to get on the water and be part of the action. As we have said countless times now, there really is no better way to see Scotland than from the water and this is especially true when talking about the iconic Forth Bridges! For more information go to: http://www.forthbridgesfestival.com/flotilla-entry/

Scotland’s Boat Show at Kip Marina is taking place 10-12 October 2014, are you going to be there? RYA Scotland are one of the main sponsors again for this event and it would be great to see everyone again. Last year we had a great time offering up free dinghy taster sessions for the kids to try sailing and also sailing experiences on Drum as well as some talks and workshops on the shore. We hope to offer up just as good a programme of activities again this year so keep an eye out for announcements a bit closer to the event. Last year was full of laughs and sunshine so fingers crossed for more sunshine and make sure you come down to the RYA Scotland stand to say hello!

The RYA Scotland team has had a fantastic time hearing from so many people and talking to them about the boating they do in the run up to and during the Commonwealth Flotilla. Don’t stop! As James mentioned above we want to keep hearing from everyone and sharing the good news stories about boating in Scotland. We communicate through our monthly e-newsletter (register to receive it here), our website, our RYA Scotland Facebook page and also our @RYAScotland Twitter feed and Instagram account. So please do share with us your stories and pictures from out on the water and also feel free to tell us about events you are involved with so that we can help with spreading the word. Communication and Marketing Manager Claire is always happy to hear about a variety of interesting stories so please do drop her an email if you have something to share: claire.caffrey@ryascotland.org.uk

Kind regards,

The RYA Scotland and Commonwealth Flotilla Team

RYA Chief Instructor, Sail Cruising, Vaughan Marsh shares his top tips for picking up a mooring buoy under sail.

Last month we looked at picking up a buoy under motor, however sometimes your engine may not work or you decide you would like to sail onto the buoy just because it’s a nice thing to do. In this issue RYA Chief Instructor, Sail Cruising, Vaughan Marsh shares his top tips for picking up a mooring buoy under sail.

“The majority of the skills are the same however, at some stage you will need to have the vessel stopped at the buoy with the sails depowered. With some basic knowledge of sailing, a good appraisal and plan this is easily achievable and a satisfying skill to master”, commented Vaughan.

Let’s look at the stages in more detail – Appraise, Plan, Execute and Review.

Appraise

  1. Are you allowed to use the mooring?
    An almanac, local chart or harbour master can help you
  2. Is there enough depth for your vessel?
    Are there any hazards to be aware of?
  3. Which way to approach?
    Look at how other vessels are lying to the buoys and position your boat at the same angle to your selected buoy. If there are no other boats to act as a guide, position your vessel down tide, or if there is no tide, downwind of the buoy.
  4. Do a recce under sail.
    Approach the buoy from a close hauled to beam reach position, pass the buoy and check:

    1. What direction is the wind passing the over buoy?
    2. Is there any movement of water if so which direction is it flowing?
    3. What attachments are there on the buoy to secure too?
    4. What is the actual depth?
    5. What is your escape route if the pick-up is unsuccessful first time?
  5. Confirmation of tide:
    Once at the buoy, bear away onto a beam reach (if safe to do so) and monitor your wash behind you in comparison to the buoy. If it remains steady, there is little or no tide, if the buoy seems to move towards or away from the wind, this will help you ascertain which direction the tide is flowing.

 

Plan

Manoeuvre your vessel to a safe area and create your plan then brief the crew and let them know what their role will be.

  1. What sail do I need to approach the buoy?
    You need to approach the buoy so you can de-power the sail.

    1. No tide: Plan to use the mainsail
    2. Wind with tide : Plan to use the Mainsail
    3. Wind against tide: Plan to use the foresail
    4. A combination of the above: Try an approach with the main as a practice and see if once on the approach angle, when you let out the sail it flaps, if it does use the main, if not try the headsail.
  2. Where to start your approach?
    Much further away than you would for power. You need to be able to approach the buoy with enough time to get the yacht sailing and test depowering the sail to see how quickly the vessel slows and accelerates, so the yacht is under control before arriving at the buoy.
  3. What approach angle will you use?
    1. No Tide: Using the Mainsail, approach the buoy from a Close reach to start with, if you can depower then stick with it, if not keep pinching up to windward until you are able to depower and power the main, then use that as your initial approach angle
    2. Wind with tide: Using the Mainsail, approach the buoy from a Close reach to start with, if you can depower then stick with it, if not keep pinching up to windward until you are able to depower and power the main, then use that as your initial approach angle
    3. Wind against tide: Using the Headsail from a position upwind of the buoy

    Once at your starting position try and find a transit with the buoy and something behind it. When approaching the buoy maintain that transit to ensure you are not being pushed off by wind or tide.

  1. Where should the pick-up point be relative to the vessel?
    Many people pick up at the bow, but bear in mind once you are about a boat length from the buoy you can’t see it! Try an approach where you are bringing the buoy alongside at the shrouds or mid-ships. The vessel should be to leeward or down tide of the buoy so if you miss it, the elements will push you away from it rather than onto it.
  2. How do I control the speed?
    1. If using the mainsail: Use the fill and spill method (let the main out until it depowers and then before you lose all way, pull it back again in to maintain steerage). Although minimum boat speed for steerage still applies, it will be unlikely if you allow the yacht to stop you will get her moving again easily so try and keep her moving until you confident you will get to the buoy, this is a balancing act and the best part of sailing onto a buoy.
    2. If using the headsail: De-power using the sheets as normal, however if you are still moving too quickly or for better control. Reduce the size of the sail until you are moving just slightly quicker than the speed of the tide, the ease and power up the sail using the sheets. As a safety point beware of the crew on the foredeck with flapping sheets and try to minimise this.
    3. If using both sails: You would generally only select this if you couldn’t approach with one sail due to light airs, lots of tide or needing to punch through chop but NOT from downwind of the buoy as you won’t be able to depower the main.
  3. Speed of approach
    Minimum boat speed for steerage is the key. Use transits to the side to monitor your speed. Using the GPS or log for speed with a tide running is little or no use. A member of crew calling distance from the buoy can also be useful.

  4. What is your escape route?
    Work out which way you would turn to get the yacht into safe water for the whole of the approach.
  5. Lines rigged for the pick-up and boat hook ready
    One end of the warp will need to be made off on a cleat via a fairlead, the other end will need to be with a crew member on the pre-planned side of the yacht. Make sure your crew know what to do with the line once attached to the buoy and how to secure it to the yacht ensuring it is through a fairlead or the bow roller and not tangled or over the guard wires.
  6. To Lasso or not to lasso?
    Normally you chose to sail onto a buoy to test your skills as a yachtsman, so if at all possible avoid lassoing. Slow the yacht and with a boat hook pick up the pickup buoy or with a crew member lying on the deck amidships, pass the line through the ring and take it forward. Although lassoing is not the preferred option sometimes in an emergency or if you are short-handed a lasso is the easiest option. Help crew rig the lasso and get them to practice throwing and securing it prior to the approach. If you are using a lasso have a second line ready to use so as soon as you are attached by the lasso, rigging a line to the correct ring or loop on the buoy and removing the lasso. Don’t stay on the lasso as it damages the buoy, creates chafe on your warp and can fall off of or get tangled around the buoy.
  7. How will the crew tell you how far to the buoy, where it is and when it is secure?
    Ensure you both understand the measurement i.e. feet or meters and that you can both see and hear each other.
  8. Do the Crew understand what is expected of them?
    Once you have your plan make sure your brief your crew and confirm they understand it.
  9. If at first you don’t succeed!
    If you miss the buoy first time don’t hurl abuse at the crew, use your escape route, have a think on why it didn’t work, re appraise, if it’s a new plan tell the crew, re-rig and go again.
  10. What next?
    Once secured to the buoy drop and secure the sails. Then determine how long you are going to stay. If more than two hours consider a second line though the buoy as a round turn and two half hitches to remove chafe and leave the other line slack as a safety line. Check that the depth will be sufficient for the time you are staying.

Execute

Once you have made you plan follow it. Constantly monitor your speed, depth, angle of approach and any hazards. Don’t be afraid to abort and change the plan.

Review

Once secured to the buoy:

  1. Once secured to the buoy drop and secure the sails, then determine how long you are going to stay
  2. Check all lines are secured correctly to the deck and buoy.
  3. Remove as many chances of chafe as possible. If staying more than two hours consider a second line though the buoy such as a round turn and two half hitches to remove chafe and leave the other line slack as a safety line.
  4. Look at other vessels around you and if the tide or wind changes how will this affect you or them?
  5. If staying for a while, consider setting your anchor alarm.
  6. If staying overnight consider rigging an all-round white.
  7. Check the tide again to ensure there is enough water for your whole stay.
  8. Contact the owner of the buoy to pay.
  9. Review with the crew what went well and what, if anything, didn’t.
  10. Sit back and enjoy your new surroundings.
  11. And finally, as you have sailed on and it went so well, why not work out how you are going to sail off when it’s time to leave!

For further information visit:-

http://www.thegreenblue.org.uk/

RYA Chief Instructor, Sail Cruising, Vaughan Marsh shares his top tips for picking up a mooring buoy under power.

 

Mooring buoy

There are many reasons to pick up a mooring buoy, but let’s take a closer look at what’s involved using the process – Appraise, Plan, Execute and Review

 

Appraise

 

  1. Are you allowed to use the mooring? An almanac, local chart or harbour master can help you
  2. Is there enough depth for your vessel? Are there any hazards to be aware of?
  3. Which way to approach? Look at how other vessels are lying to the buoys and position your boat at the same angle to your selected buoy. If there are no other boats to act as a guide choose a down tide, or if no tide, downwind of the buoy.
  4. Do a recce. Pass the buoy and check, what direction is the wind passing the over buoy? Is there any movement of water if so which direction is it flowing? What attachments are there on the buoy to secure too? What is the actual depth? What is your escape route if the pick-up is unsuccessful first time?

 

Plan

 

Manoeuvre your vessel to a safe area and create your plan then brief the crew and let them know what their role will be.

  1. Where to start your approach?
    Your approach should be down wind or down tide whichever is stronger, but it could also be a combination of the two. There is no definitive answer, you will need to monitor on the run in.
  2. What approach angle will you use?
    Once at your starting position, try and find a transit with the buoy and something behind it. When approaching the buoy maintain that transit to ensure you are not being pushed off by wind or tide.
  3. Where should the pick-up point be relative to the vessel?
    Many people pick up at the bow, but bear in mind once you are about a boat length from the buoy you can’t see it! Try an approach where you are bringing the buoy alongside at the shrouds or mid-ships, preferably on the same side as the throttle control. If in a motor vessel or a vessel with high topsides sometimes an approach from the stern to pick up from the sugar scoop or bathing platform is easier. The vessel should be to leeward or down tide of the buoy so if you miss it the elements will push you away from it rather than onto it.
  4. Speed of approach
    Minimum boat speed for steerage is the key. Use transits to the side of your vessel to monitor your speed, it’s much easier to put power on than take it off. Using the GPS or log for speed with a tide running is little or no use. A member of crew calling distance from the buoy can also be useful.
  5. What is your escape route?
    Work out which way you would turn to get the yacht into safe water for the whole of the approach.
  6. Lines rigged for the pick-up and boat hook ready
    One end of the warp will need to be made off on a cleat via a fairlead, the other end will need to be with a crew member on the pre-planned side of the yacht. If approaching the buoy as a sternboard approach, your bow line will need to be brought aft whilst ensuring it is led outside of any obstacles. Make sure your crew know what to do with the line once attached to the buoy and how to secure it to the yacht ensuring it is through a fairlead or the bow roller and not tangled or over the guard wires.
  7. To Lasso or not to lasso?
    Although probably not the preferred option sometimes a lasso is the easiest temporary option. Help crew rig the lasso and get them to practice throwing and securing it prior to the approach. Have a second line ready to use, as soon as you are attached by the lasso, attach the second line to the ring or loop on the buoy and remove the lasso. Don’t stay on the lasso as it damages the buoy, creates chafe on your warp and can fall off of and get tangled around the buoy.
  8. How will the crew tell you how far to the buoy, where it is and when it is secure?
    Ensure you both understand the measurement i.e. feet or meters and that you they can see and hear each other. Working out some simple hand signals are also useful.
  9. Do the Crew understand what is expected of them?
    Once you have your plan make sure your brief your crew and confirm they understand their role.
  10. If at first you don’t succeed!
    If you miss the buoy first time don’t hurl abuse at the crew, use your escape route, have a think on why it didn’t work, re appraise, if it’s a new plan tell the crew, re-rig and go again.

 

Execute

 

Once you have made your plan follow it. Constantly monitor your speed, depth, angle of approach and any hazards. Don’t be afraid to abort and change the plan.

 

Review

 

Once secured to the buoy:

  1. Determine how long you are going to stay
  2. Check all lines are secured correctly to the deck and buoy. If staying for more than two hours or if it is a windy or choppy day, consider a second line though the securing point on the buoy as a round turn and two half hitches to remove chafe, leaving the other line slack as a safety line.
  3. Remove as many chances of chafe as possible.
  4. Look at other vessels around you and if the tide or wind changes how will this affect you or them?
  5. If staying for a while, consider setting your anchor alarm.
  6. If staying overnight consider rigging an all-round white.
  7. Check the tide again to ensure there is enough water for your whole stay.
  8. Contact the owner of the buoy to pay.
  9. Review with the crew what went well and what if anything didn’t.
  10. Sit back and enjoy your new surroundings.

 

NOTE from Carck Castle Boat Club:

Ref. Appraise item 1 above – private moorings in Carrick Castle vary in capacity from 500 kg to 15 tonnes and have tags stating these moorings are PRIVATE MOORINGS and visitors should either use the blue visitors’ moorings provided or anchor. Payment has to be made for using a visitor’s mooring unless being used for a lunch stop between 11.00 & 14.00 hrs when they are free. At all other times the charge is £10.00 per day/night. See our Visitors’ Moorings page.

HMRC Reference:Notice 8 (April 2012)

 

1. Introduction

1.1 What is this notice about?

This notice explains customs arrival/departure requirements for private individuals who sail their pleasure craft to and from the United Kingdom and within EU waters.

For the purpose of this notice, a pleasure craft is defined as a vessel which at the time of its arrival in the UK, or at the time of its departure from a port in the UK, is being used for private recreational purposes.

1.2 What has changed?

It has been rewritten and restructured to improve readability and includes:

  • Changes following the introduction of the UK Border Agency (UKBA)
  • new information regarding importing foodstuffs from outside the EU into the UK
  • changes to the section on relief available under ‘Temporary Admission’ for temporarily imported non EU vessels
  • new contact details for temporary admission purposes.

It replaces the April 2011 version.

You can access details of any changes to this notice since April 2011 either on our Internet site at hmrc.gov.uk or by phoning our VAT, Excise & Customs helpline on: 0300 200 3700.

This notice and others mentioned are available on our website: www.hmrc.gov.uk and may also be available in hard copy (contact the VAT, Excise and Customs helpline to check hard copy availability).

1.3 Who should read this notice?

This notice is intended for anyone who owns or is responsible for a pleasure craft that sails to or from locations outside the United Kingdom.

The Channel Islands are treated as a place outside the United Kingdom and the European Union for VAT purposes.

1.4 What law covers this notice?

The legislation upon which this notice is based is:

  • The Customs and Excise Management Act (1979) (CEMA)
  • The Pleasure Craft (Arrival and Report) Regulations made under CEMA sections 35(4) and 42(1)(a)
  • Commissioner’s Directions made under CEMA sections 35(1) and 64(2)
  • Council Regulation (EEC) 2913/92 establishing the Community Customs Code
  • Commission Regulation (EEC) 2454/93, which lays down the provision for implementation of the Community Customs Code
  • EU law on import VAT and VAT on vessels leaving the UK is contained in Council Directive 2006/112/EC, which is interpreted into UK law in the Value Added Tax Act 1994 and Value Added Tax Regulations 1995. Other VAT directives may also apply.

This notice is not the law. It is HMRC’s view of the law and nothing in this notice takes the place of the law.

2. Control of private pleasure craft

2.1 Why do the border authorities need to control private pleasure craft?

HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) and the UK Border Agency (UKBA) are responsible for the management of fiscal, regulatory and enforcement activities at frontier locations. HMRC has overall responsibility for policy and procedures relating to the inward/outward pleasure craft reporting function. The UKBA has responsibility for implementing HMRC policies and procedures at the frontier and for the prevention of smuggling of dutiable or prohibited/restricted goods. The UKBA also has responsibility for immigration matters.

Jointly, HMRC and the UKBA also have a responsibility to other Member States of the European Union to control the frontier between the EU and countries that are not full members.

The UKBA will still need to carry out checks on persons on board pleasure craft. Even so, only a small proportion of those who are on an intra-Community voyage will be asked to confirm that their last port of call was another place in the EU.

The Customs and Excise Management Act 1979 gives UKBA officers the necessary powers to stop board and search a vessel and to ask questions. This applies whether the vessel sailed from a port within the EU or from a country outside the EU.

Carrying cargo

If you carry any goods for industrial or commercial purposes, your vessel becomes a commercial vessel and is no longer a pleasure craft. Notice 69 Report and Clearance by Ships Masters’ explains the customs requirements for commercial vessels.

2.2 The Schengen Agreement

Some EU and other European countries, but not the UK, are partner to the Schengen Agreement under which border controls on persons between Schengen members have been abolished. Consequently, travellers from the UK to a Schengen country or those leaving for the UK from one may find that they are subject to additional checks when overseas because of the Schengen commitment to reinforcing frontiers between Schengen members and countries which are not party to the Agreement. However, the UK’s law and practices do not differentiate in any way between Schengen members and non-members.

As at April 2011, the Schengen members with coastlines, which were actually operating the Convention, were Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, France, Greece, Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia, Malta, Poland and Slovenia.

3. Arriving in the United Kingdom

3.1 Do I need to fly the yellow ‘Q’ flag?

If you are arriving directly from another EU Member State there is no need to fly the ‘Q’ flag.

If you are arriving from outside the EU (and this includes the Channel Islands) you must fly the ‘Q’ flag, where it can readily be seen, as soon as you enter UK waters (the 12 mile limit). Do not take down the flag until you have finished reporting to the customs authorities, as described in sub-section 3.2. Failure to comply will make you liable to a penalty.

3.2 Do I need to notify the customs authorities on arrival?

Whether you need to notify your arrival to the customs authorities depends upon where your last port of call was. If you are arriving directly from an EU Member State, you only need to contact the customs authorities if you have goods to declare. However, there may still be immigration requirements that need to be met and you should refer to sub-section 3.14 for details.

When arriving direct from a country outside the EU (the Channel Islands are regarded as outside the EU for this purpose), you must phone the National Yacht line on 0845 723 1110. You will need to inform the Yachtline if any of the following apply:

  • VAT has not been paid on the vessel
  • you have any goods in excess of the travellers’ allowance detailed in Notice 1 Travelling to the UK
  • you have on board goods which are to be treated as duty free stores
  • you have any prohibited or restricted goods
  • there is any notifiable illness on board
  • there are any people on board who need immigration clearance, or
  • any repairs or modifications, other than running repairs, have been carried out since the vessel last left the EU.

You will need to comply with any further instructions that you are given.

If arriving from outside the EU the National Yachtline will ask you to complete form C1331. If you already have a form C1331 Part 2 on board, from when the vessel left the UK, you should complete section (iii) amending details of persons on board, if necessary, then sign and date the form again. You can obtain form C1331 from the HM Revenue & Customs website at hmrc.gov.uk or by calling the VAT, Excise & Customs helpline on 0300 200 3700. The form may also be available from some local yacht clubs and marinas.

You should send the completed C1331 forms to the UKBA address shown in sub-section 7.2 which is also given on the C1331 form.

Except for contacting the customs authorities as above, you must not land goods or persons or transfer them to another vessel until a customs official says you may do so.

3.3 What goods must I declare?

If you have arrived from another EU Member State, you must declare the following goods:

  • any animals or birds (see sub-section 3.11.)
  • any prohibited and restricted goods including certain foodstuffs (see sub-sections 3.8 – 3.15).
  • any duty free stores (see Notice 69A Duty free ships stores), and
  • the boat itself, if it is liable to VAT (see sub-section 4.1).

If you have come directly from a country outside the EU – and the Channel Islands are regarded as outside the EU for this purpose – you must declare:

  • any of the goods listed in the four categories above
  • any goods which, as a visitor, you intend to leave behind when you depart from the UK or another EU Member State to a place outside the EU
  • any tobacco goods, alcoholic drinks in excess of the duty-free allowances set out in Notice 1 Travelling to the UK, and
  • if you are a returning resident of the UK or another EU Member State, any other goods you have acquired on your trip, where the total value of these goods exceeds £270 as described in Notice 1 Travelling tothe UK. This includes any equipment which you may have bought and had fitted to the boat outside the EU.

If anyone on board fails to declare goods in any of these categories, that person may be liable to a fine and the goods may be seized.

3.4 Will I have to pay taxes or duties on my pleasure craft?

Vessels less than 12 metres long are potentially liable to customs duty when imported from outside the EU and all vessels designed or adapted for recreation or pleasure use are potentially liable to VAT.

If you are temporarily importing your boat from outside the EU, it may qualify for relief from these charges as described in Section 5.

If you are permanently importing the boat on transfer of your residence from outside the EU, it may qualify for the relief described in sub-section 3.15.

A boat previously VAT paid and exported from the EU may also qualify for relief on return if:

  • imported normally within 3 years of its export from the EU, and
  • imported by the person who exported it from the EU, and
  • it has undergone no more than running repairs outside the EU that did not increase its value.

For more information refer to Notice 236 Customs: Importing returned goods free of duty and tax.

If, after reading this notice, you are still in any doubt about whether customs charges are due, you should contact the VAT, Excise & Customs helpline on 0300 200 3700.

3.5 Can a vessel lose its VAT paid status?

VAT is due on the importation of any vessel from outside the EU. However, there are provisions for this VAT to be relieved when an EU VAT paid vessel returns to the EU, refer to sub-section 3.4. If an EU VAT paid vessel leaves the EU, and whilst outside the EU it is sold, the new owner will, unless eligible for one of the reliefs described in this Notice, be liable to pay VAT if the vessel is brought back into the EU.

3.6 What are the duty free allowances from outside the EU?

If you are 17 years of age or more and you have arrived from outside the EU by pleasure craft, your duty free entitlement is the allowances for travellers to the UK as shown in Notice 1 Travelling to the UK.

Persons under 17 years of age are not allowed duty free allowances for tobacco products and alcoholic drinks but may bring in other goods as shown in Notice 1 Travelling to the UK.

Any goods over the allowance may be:

  • released on payment of duty, or
  • placed under seal on board your vessel in a compartment that is capable of being sealed until you leave the UK.

3.7 What are the allowances within the EU?

If you arrive in the UK by pleasure craft directly from the EU, you will be allowed to bring back as much EU duty paid goods, including tobacco and alcohol, as you like as long as it is for your own use. This includes bringing them back for your own consumption and bringing back gifts for family and friends.

You cannot bring back goods for commercial purposes, which includes bringing back goods for payment, even payment in kind. Goods cannot be brought back for family and friends if they are paying you, giving you cost price, or paying some or all of your travel costs. You cannot bring back goods for re-sale.

If you bring back large quantities of alcohol or tobacco goods, you may be asked some basic questions about the trip and the purchases and the purpose for which you hold the goods. This particularly applies if you have with you more than the following amounts:

  • 800 cigarettes
  • 200 cigars
  • 400 cigarillos
  • 1kg of smoking tobacco
  • 110 litres of beer
  • 90 litres of wine
  • 10 litres of spirits
  • 20 litres of fortified wine (such as port or sherry).

3.8 What are prohibited and restricted (P & R) goods?

The importation, possession or use of certain goods in the UK is either prohibited or restricted. The following are just a few examples of goods that are either prohibited or restricted:

  • Controlled drugs
  • Firearms, ammunition and explosives
  • Offensive weapons
  • Indecent and obscene material
  • Endangered animal and plant species including derivatives and products that contain them
  • Cat and dog fur and products made from such fur
  • Seal products.

Further details of prohibited and restricted goods are given on the reverse of form C1331 Part 2 and you can also obtain details from Notice 1 Travelling to the UK. If you know you have, or you think that you may have, such goods aboard you should contact the National Yachtline immediately and comply with any instructions given. Failure to declare such goods may result in the goods being seized and the person concerned may be prosecuted which may make them liable to a heavy fine.

If goods are smuggled, the vessel itself may be seized and the persons concerned liable to a heavy fine and/or a prison sentence following prosecution.

3.9 Animals including pets, dogs, cats, birds, rabbits and rodents

It is advisable to check with Defra’s Animal Health before bringing in any live animals or birds. Defra helpline number 08459 335577.

Any animals or birds, which are kept on board the vessel, must be reported to the National Yachtline on arrival.

Pet animals may only be imported if they comply with the PETS Scheme or are licensed by Animal Health and are quarantined upon arrival. For further information visit Defra or phone the PETS helpline on 0870 241 1710 or email quarantine@animalhealth.gsi.gov.uk.

Pet birds from non-EU countries may only be imported if they are licensed by Animal Health. Farm animals and poultry may not be imported as “pets”. For further information and advice on importing birds or farm animals contact Animal Health by email at AHITChelmsford@animalhealth.gsi.gov.uk or phone 01245 454860.

Some animals and species are also subject to CITES* legislation restricting the trade in endangered species.

*Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.

Animals or birds brought to the UK without a licence must always be kept in an enclosed part of the vessel below deck. Do not let them come into contact with any other animals. They should never be allowed to come ashore without the authority of the appropriate Animal Health official.

3.10 Plants and Plant products

A range of plants or plant products such as potatoes, oranges and apples are also subject to strict border controls. For further information on plants or plant products contact the Food and environmental research agency (Fera). They can be contacted through the Fera-Plant Health Import desk on 0844 248 0071.

3.11 Products of Animal Origin (POAO)

From most countries outside of the EU you are not allowed to bring in any meats or dairy products because they may carry diseases which can devastate the UK’s environment and economy. Other animal products may also be banned although you may bring in a small quantity of some products from certain countries. You are advised to check the rules before arriving in the UK. For more information refer to Defra’s website or contact Defra’s helpline on 08459 335577 if calling from the UK or +44 (0)20 7238 6951 if calling from outside of the UK.

3.12 Rough Diamonds

If you are bringing in rough (i.e. uncut or unpolished) diamonds from outside the EU, you must have a validKimberley Process Certificate.

For more information and advice, phone the Government Diamond Office at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on 020 7008 6903_highlighting.

3.13 Certain radio transmitters

Certain radio transmitters such as CB radios and cordless phones are not approved for use in the UK. For more information and advice, phone Ofcom on 020 7981 3000.

3.14 Are there any immigration requirements when I arrive in the UK?

Anyone on board who is not an EU national must get a UKBA officer’s permission to enter the UK from a place other than the Isle of Man, or the Channel Islands. As the person responsible, you must make sure that anyone requiring immigration clearance (including yourself if appropriate) obtains the necessary permission to enter.

If there is anyone on board requiring immigration clearance, they will need to contact the nearest UKBA office by phone to arrange clearance. The National Yachtline will be able to advise on how to do this.

3.15 Are there any additional requirements if I am transferring my residence to a place in the EU?

If you are moving your normal home from a non-EU country to an EU country, including the UK, you may import your vessel free of customs duty and VAT providing that you:

  • have lived outside the EU for a continuous period of at least 12 months, and
  • have possessed and used the vessel outside the EU for at least 6 months prior to importation, and
  • did not get the vessel under a duty/tax free scheme (see below), and
  • declare the vessel to an officer, and
  • will keep the vessel in the EU for private use, and
  • do not sell, lend, hire out or otherwise dispose of the vessel in the EU within 12 months of importation unless you notify the Personal Transport Unit first, on 01304 664171, and duty and VAT is paid on disposal.

If you purchased the vessel under a duty/tax free scheme in the vessel’s country of origin or departure, relief from customs duty and VAT will only apply if at the time of purchase you were:

  • a diplomat
  • a member of an officially recognised international organisation
  • a member of NATO or UK forces, or the civilian staff accompanying them, or the spouse of such a member, or
  • able to prove that duty and tax has subsequently been paid and has not been, nor will be, refunded.

To declare a vessel, and to claim any relief from duty and VAT that may apply on transfer of residence, you should complete form C104A (Vessels). You should be ready to produce the vessel and all evidence of use and possession outside the EU such as registration papers and berthing fees. The rules regarding a persons ‘normal home’ are complex. If you are in any doubt, please contact the VAT, Excise & Customs helpline on 0300 200 3700.

If you do not arrive with the vessel yourself, it will not normally be released until you arrive. However, it may be released for storage under certain conditions. Contact the VAT, Excise & Customs helpline on 0300 200 3700 for details of these arrangements.

If you temporarily import a non-EU vessel and claim relief under Temporary Admission (see Secti 5) and then you decide to move your normal home to the UK, you may still be able to apply for Transfer of Residence relief subject to the conditions above.  

4. Sailing a pleasure craft within EU waters

4.1 Will I have to pay VAT on a vessel to be kept in the EU?

Yes if,

a) you import a vessel into the EU you will have to pay VAT on the vessel’s value at the time of import; however in certain circumstances reliefs may be available for vessels imported from outside the EU, or

b) you are buying a new pleasure craft in the EU and intend to keep it in the EU, you will have to pay VAT on the purchase price. If you are keeping the vessel in the UK, the VAT due will be payable in the UK. If you buy a new vessel in one Member State but intend to keep it in another Member State, you should consult VAT Notice 728 New Means of Transport which explains the relevant rules.

4.2 What documents will be required to provide proof of the VAT status on a used vessel?

EU residents should only use a vessel in the Community if it is VAT paid or ‘deemed’ VAT paid. Documentary evidence supporting this should be carried at all times as you may be asked by customs officials to provide evidence of your vessel’s VAT status, either in the UK or in other Member States. Documentary evidence might include:

  • original invoice or receipt
  • evidence that VAT was paid at importation, and/or
  • invoices for materials used in the construction of a ‘Home-Built’ vessel.

A registration document on its own does not prove the VAT status of the vessel, as there is no link in the UK between the registry of the vessel and the payment of VAT. If you have difficulty in providing the information, you should contact the VAT, Excise & Customs helpline on 0300 200 3700.

Certain vessels that were in use as private pleasure craft prior to 1 January 1985 and were in the EU on 31 December 1992, may be deemed VAT paid under the Single Market transitional arrangements. As Austria, Finland and Sweden joined the EU later, the relevant dates for vessels in these countries are ‘in use’ before 1 January 1987 and moored in EU on 31 December 1994.

After this date there were no further transitional arrangements agreed by the EU Commission for subsequent EU expansions.

The following documents are useful to prove the age and location of the vessel:

For Age

For Location

Marine survey Receipt for mooring
Part 1 Registration Receipt for harbour dues
Insurance documents Dry dock records
Builders certificate

If you are unable to provide any of the above for used vessels kept in the UK you should, whilst cruising within the EU, carry a Bill of Sale (if applicable and between two private individuals in the UK). Whilst this is not conclusive proof that VAT has been paid, it does indicate that the tax status is the responsibility of UK customs authorities. It is also advisable to contact the relevant authorities in the Member State you intend to visit, or their Embassy in the UK, to confirm what documentation will be required in advance of your voyage.

When buying a used pleasure craft from any VAT registered business in the EU, you should make sure that the invoice shows separately any VAT which that business has charged to you on supply of the pleasure craft. If the invoice does not show VAT separately you may have difficulty in demonstrating that VAT has been paid. If you are buying from a business that does not charge VAT on the transaction or from a private individual in the EU and the seller states that VAT has previously been paid on the vessel, you should obtain evidence from the seller that VAT has previously been accounted for.

4.3 Spares, accessories and equipment

These may include:

  • Normal spare parts and equipment carried with the vessel
  • Articles for use on board the vessel such as life boats, life saving devices and furniture including first aid and survival equipment.

These do not need to be declared unless they are imported separately from the vessel.

4.4 VAT Avoidance Schemes

HMRC are aware that VAT avoidance schemes are marketed in the pleasure craft sector. The schemes typically involve artificial leasing or chartering arrangements under which the user acquires a new pleasure craft which is claimed to have ‘VAT paid’ status while, in reality, paying no VAT (or a minimal amount of VAT).

If there is evidence to suggest a vessel has been purchased through such a scheme, HMRC may investigate with a view to recovering any unpaid VAT. It is also possible that interest and penalties may be charged in relation to any unpaid VAT.

If you are purchasing a used pleasure craft which has previously been subject to a leasing or chartering arrangement you should be alert to the possibility that it might have been supplied through a VAT avoidance scheme.

If you are concerned that a vessel may have been supplied through a VAT avoidance scheme you should, in the first instance, contact our VAT, Excise & Customs helpline on 0300 200 3700.

 

5. Temporarily importing a non EU vessel

5.1 Can I claim relief from customs duty and VAT?

Subject to certain conditions vessels which are temporarily imported from outside the EU for private use may be eligible for relief from duty and VAT. This relief is called Temporary Admission (TA).

The vessel must be:

  • registered outside the customs territory of the EU in the name of a person established outside the customs territory of the EU. If it is not registered it must belong to someone who has their normal place of residence outside the customs territory of EU, and
  • be used by a non EU resident (there are limited exceptions where use can be made by a UK/EU resident, these are explained in the table in sub-section 5.4).

The vessel must also be clearly identifiable, for example by registration number/ certificate, name of the vessel or hull identification number.

5.2 What is the definition of private use?

Private use means recreational (non-commercial) use; this can also include the use of a company owned vessel for private recreational purposes – see definition for pleasure craft in sub-section 1.1.

5.3 What is the period of relief for non EU residents?

Private use by a non EU resident can be for up to 18 months. However, if the vessel has been rehired by an EU hire service to a non EU resident for private use, the vessel must be re-exported outside the EU within 8 days of the hire.

5.4 Private use by a UK/EU resident

If you are a UK/EU resident private use can be made if you………… The vessel ………..
1 the vessel

  • has been temporarily imported by the *registration holder, who is a non EU resident, for their own use,and
  • the non EU registration holder has instructed you may use it occasionally whilst they remain in the EU.

*Where the vessel is registered in the name of a non EU company / trust, an employee / member of the company / trust must be a non EU resident importing the vessel for theirown use to meet these conditions. Non EU residents employed or otherwise engaged solely as crew members donot meet these conditions.

Written permission from the non EU registration holder must be made available to Customs/Border agency officers if requested.

This must confirm:

  • the non EU registration holders name and address including a contact phone number /email where they can be contacted while they are in the EU
  • that they are the registration holder or, if the vessel is registered to a non EU company / trust, they have written permission from the company/trust identifying their status or position within that company/trust and authority to act as registration holder
  • the date the non EU registration holder imported the vessel
  • that the vessel has been temporarily imported for the non EU registration holders own use
  • dates the non EU registration holder will be allowing you to use the vessel including your name, address and phone number/email

that the non EU registration holder will remain in the EU during any period you use the vessel.

can be used until the registration holder or their non EU representative leaves the EU up to a maximum of 18 months

Note: during these periods the vessel must predominately be for use by the non EU resident registration holder

For the purposes of relief the registration holder will be the person, company or trust in whose name the vessel is registered as the keeper or owner. This person, company or trust must be established outside the EU.

2 you hire it outside the EU to return to your home in the EU must be re-exported or returned to the hire service in the EU within 8 days of the hire
3 you hire it to leave the EU must be re-exported outside the EU within 8 days of the hire
4 you are employed and authorised by the non EU owner and private use is allowed for in your contract of employment (the owner does not need to be in the EU at the time of use) can be used for up to a maximum of 18 months
5 you are preparing to transfer your normal home and emigrate outside the EU must be re-exported within 3 months, see paragraph 5.11.

5.5 How do I claim relief?

Subject to the conditions outlined in sub-sections 5.1 to 5.4. no formal application for authorisation or customs declaration to claim relief will be required when you arrive direct from a country outside the EU (the Channel Islands are regarded as outside the EU for this purpose). When you enter UK territorial waters (the 12 mile limit) without making a customs declaration (other than the mandatory arrival report as per the note below) this will be treated as:

  • a declaration that you and the vessel that is being imported are eligible for relief, and
  • an application for Temporary Admission (TA) authorisation.

If the vessel arrives in the EU in another Member State, the customs authorities in that Member State should be contacted to claim relief. If the vessel is subsequently used in the UK no further declaration will be required but you must be able to provide details, if asked, of when and where the vessel first arrived in the EU.

Use in the UK and elsewhere within the EU.

Although no formal declaration for relief is required, if you use the vessel in the UK before using it in other Member States, you may wish to make an oral declaration and submit an inventory document at the time of import to apply for authorisation and claim relief. This is not mandatory but can help to provide evidence to customs authorities in other Member States that relief under TA was initially claimed in the UK. For further details see Notice 308 Temporary Admission – temporarily importing non-EU means of transport.

Note – Although no formal declaration to claim Temporary Admission is required, if the pleasure craft is arriving in the UK direct from a country outside the EU it will be necessary to:

  • fly the ‘Q’ flag and phone the National Yachtline on 0845 723 1110 to notify the arrival
  • complete a C1331 form
  • report any prohibited or restricted goods, any duty free stores and any persons that require immigration clearance.

For further details see sub-sections 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3.

5.6 Extending the period of visit, or deciding to live permanently in the EU

The periods set out in sub-sections 5.3 and 5.4 can be extended in exceptional circumstances within reasonable limits, for example to carry out running repairs necessary before the vessel can be used to leave the EU. If an extension is needed, submit a written request to the Temporary Admission Team at the address in sub-section 5.9 and explain why it is needed.

If you decide to live permanently in the EU, you should write to the Temporary Admission Team to advise them and to give details of the vessel. The vessel will no longer be entitled to relief under Temporary Admission but it may qualify for an alternative relief for transfer of residence, see sub-section 3.15 for further details.

If at any time during a stay in the UK a vessel no longer qualifies for relief, the Temporary Admission Team must be contacted to advise them of the change in circumstances. It will then be necessary to complete a diversion entry on Form C88 to pay the taxes/duties due; Notice 308 Temporary Admission – temporarily importing non-EU means of transport explains how to complete the declaration.

5.7 What records must I keep?

It will be necessary for you to provide the following if requested:

  • proof that the vessel is registered outside the customs territory of the EU in the name of a non EU person
  • if the vessel is not registered, proof that it is owned by a non EU person
  • a passport/identity card for the person claiming relief to confirm their normal place of residence
  • if a UK or EU resident, details to support the claim to relief referred to in the table in sub-section 5.4
  • when and where the vessel arrived in the EU
  • when and where it leaves the EU or is otherwise disposed of.

These records should be kept for four years after discharging relief.

5.8 Importation by crew members

If the vessel is imported before, or after, your arrival by persons employed or otherwise engaged solely as crew, for relief purposes the nationality of crew members and their country of residence will not need to be considered. However the crew should still contact the National Yachtline as required in b-section 3.2. The crew must be able to provide your details and the date that you are due to join the vessel. Your use of the vessel will still be subject to the conditions explained in paragraph 5.1.

5.9 Temporarily leaving the EU whilst the yacht is under Temporary Admission

If the vessel will remain in the UK, the periods of relief referred to in sub-sections 5.3 and 5.4 (boxes 1, 4 and 5) can be extended for the time that you temporarily leave the EU. In these cases you should write to the Temporary Admission Team at the following address to confirm:

  • that the vessel will not be used in your absence (or if it will be used by another entitled person, details of that person), and
  • where it will be kept.

HM Revenue & Customs
Temporary Admission Team
Warwick House
67 Station Road
REDHILL
RH1 1QU

Tel: 01227 864924 or 01737 734664
Fax: 01227 864811

5.10 What do I do if I decide to keep the vessel in the EU?

If you decide not to re-export the vessel and want to keep it in the EU, you will need to divert the vessel to free circulation as per the last paragraph of sub-section 5.6.

If you are transferring your residence to the EU see sub-section 3.15.

5.11 Can an EU resident claim relief on a vessel imported into the EU when they intend to emigrate?

If you intend to emigrate outside the EU, you are permitted to temporarily import a vessel from outside the EU as long as it is re-exported within 3 months of its arrival. Evidence of your emigration will need to be provided if requested.

5.12 Does Temporary Admission apply to vessels imported for sale?

If you import a vessel for the purpose of sale, Temporary Admission under the terms explained in sub-section 5.5cannot be claimed. Relief under other temporary admission arrangements may, however, be available if the vessel is imported for:

  • satisfactory acceptance tests in connection with a sales contract
  • approval where the consignee may decide to purchase after inspection, or
  • if it is a used vessel, imported with a view to sale by auction.

For further details about these reliefs see Notice 200 Temporary Admission.

A yacht broker’s scheme which allows the suspension of payment of import duties is also available under Customs Warehousing arrangements; see Notice 232 Customs Warehousing. For details about this scheme contact the Association of Yacht Brokers and Agents (ABYA). Phone 01730 266430.

5.13 Can I scrap a vessel under Temporary Admission?

If you want to scrap your vessel you must contact the Temporary Admissions Team at the address given in sub-section 5.9 to obtain approval before it is scrapped. You will need to provide full details of the vessel, including when it was imported and where it is intended to be scrapped. If approval is given, commercial evidence that the vessel has been scrapped and the value of the scrap produced must be sent to the Temporary Admissions Team.

The Temporary Admissions Team will arrange for a post clearance demand to be issued and to collect the customs duty and/or import VAT due. This will be based on the value and at the rate applicable to the scrap.

If the vessel is scrapped without our approval you will be liable for payment on the full value and the duty rate applicable to the vessel when it was imported.

5.14 Do I need to report when re-exporting a vessel that is under Temporary Admission?

No formal customs declaration for re-export is required. The declaration for re-export is considered to be made and accepted when the vessel leaves the EU.

If an oral declaration was made, as explained in sub-section 5.5 (under the heading ‘Use in the UK and elsewhere within the EU’), you should present copy 2 of the inventory document to the customs authorities at the final place of departure from the EU. It will be stamped and returned. To confirm that the vessel has left the EU send the stamped copy 2 of the inventory document to the Temporary Admissions Team at the address given in sub-section 5.9. If there is any difficulty in having the document stamped, phone the National Yachtline for advice on 0845 723 1110.

Note: If leaving the UK and sailing direct to a non EU country then in addition to the above, you must also complete form C1331 to notify the departure, for further details about this see sub-section 6.2.

5.15 Will there be any Customs checks?

While the vessel remains in the EU it will be subject to customs supervision. Visits or checks may be carried out by customs officials to make sure that the vessel and its use satisfy all conditions for relief. If it is found that any conditions have not been met duties and/or taxes may become due.

5.16 Can I carry out routine maintenance and repairs?

Repairs can be carried out to maintain the vessel in the same condition as imported.

If the vessel is temporarily imported for overhaul, refitting, renovation or refurbishment this cannot be carried out under Temporary Admission but relief from customs charges may be available for such work under Inward Processing Relief. Further information is available in Notice 221A Inward Processing Relief using a simplified authorisation.

6.0 Leaving the United Kingdom

6.1 Do I need to notify the customs authorities before I sail my vessel outside the United Kingdom?

It is an offence not to notify the customs authorities when you intend to take your vessel directly to a country outside the EU.

If you are going directly to another Member State, you will not need to make a report unless specifically asked to do so by an officer. There is no need to make a report if you intend to ultimately leave the EU but will be calling first at another port in the EU on passage.

6.2 How do I notify the customs authorities?

It will be necessary to complete Part 1 of form C1331which can be obtained from;

  • the Revenue & Customs Website at hmrc.gov.uk
  • the VAT, Customs & Excise helpline (0300 200 3700)
  • some yacht associations, clubs and marinas.

It is important that Part 1 of the form is sent to the UKBA address in sub-section 7.2, which can also be found on the form C1331.

6.3 What should I do if the voyage is delayed or abandoned?

If there are any delays to your departure, or if any details on the notification change, you should contact the UKBA by writing to the address that the original C1331 was sent. You should also inform the UKBA of abandoned voyages by endorsing Part 2 of the C1331 with the words ‘voyage abandoned’ and then forward to the address that Part 1 was sent and, where possible, fax a copy of form C1331 to the UKBA on: 01304 664120.

6.4 Do I have to pay VAT on a vessel intended to be kept outside the EU?

If you are planning to buy a pleasure craft in the UK but intend to keep it permanently outside the Community, you may be eligible to purchase it VAT-free using the Sailaway Boat Scheme. The scheme does not apply to vessels which are for business use or which are exported in the normal way as cargo.

To obtain relief under this scheme, you will need to complete form VAT 436 which must be certified at the last point of departure from the EU. VAT Notice 703/2 Sailaway Boats explains the scheme in more detail and describes the additional procedures that you will need to follow.

In all cases, the UKBA require prior notice of departure.

6.5 Can I take duty free stores on board?

You may be eligible to take on board duty-free stores if you are going to a port south of the port of Brest or north of the north bank of the river Eider in Denmark. You will not be allowed to take duty-free stores to the Irish Republic or the Channel Islands.

Whilst the goods are duty-free, if used on a private voyage, they will still be liable for VAT. You can find further information in Notice 69A Duty free ships stores’.

6.6 Are there any immigration requirements when I depart from the UK?

You do not need to notify an Immigration officer of any voyage where the first port of call overseas is expected to be in the Channel Islands, the Irish Republic or elsewhere in the EU.

When the first port of call will be outside the EU, you need notify a UKBA officer only if you are carrying someone who has no right of abode in the EU. In these circumstances you must tell a UKBA officer in advance.

6.7 Are there any additional requirements if I am transferring my residence to a place outside the EU?

No. If you are leaving with your boat because you are transferring your residence from the UK to a place outside the EU, there are no additional customs requirements unless the boat is new.

If the boat is new, please see sub-section 6.4.

7 Contact details

7.1 To report a vessel’s arrival

National Yachtline 0845 723 1110.

7.2 Postal address for C1331 forms

United Kingdom Border Agency
Yacht Reports
Freight Clearance Centre
Lord Warden Square
Western Docks Dover
Kent
CT17 9DN

7.3 Help with VAT, excise and customs matters

The VAT, Excise and Customs Helpline 0300 200 3700.

Your rights and obligations

Your Charter explains what you can expect from us and what we can expect from you. For more information go to Your Charter.

Do you have any comments or suggestions?

If you have any comments or suggestions to make about this notice, please write to:

HM Revenue & Customs
Excise, Customs Stamps and Money/ Excise and Customs Law Team
10th Floor NW Alexander House
21 Victoria Avenue
Southend-on-Sea
SS99 1AA

Please note this address is not for general enquiries.

For your general enquiries please phone our Helpline 0300 200 3700.

Putting things right

If you are unhappy with our service, please contact the person or office you have been dealing with. They will try to put things right. If you are still unhappy, they will tell you how to complain.

If you want to know more about making a complaint go to hmrc.gov.uk and under quick links, select Complaints and appeals.

How we use your information

HM Revenue & Customs is a Data Controller under the Data Protection Act 1998. We hold information for the purposes specified in our notification to the Information Commissioner, including the assessment and collection of tax and duties, the payment of benefits and the prevention and detection of crime, and may use this information for any of them.

We may get information about you from others, or we may give information to them. If we do, it will only be as the law permits to:

  • check the accuracy of information
  • prevent or detect crime
  • protect public funds.

We may check information we receive about you with what is already in our records. This can include information provided by you, as well as by others, such as other government departments or agencies and overseas tax and customs authorities. We will not give information to anyone outside HM Revenue & Customs unless the law permits us to do so. For more information go to hmrc.gov.uk and look for Data Protection Act within the Search facility.

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The summer sailing season is starting to kick off. Boaters who have been as dormant as their boats over the winter months have sprung to life, cleaning and prepping their craft. While the sparrows prepare their nests, these boaters are getting ready to compete or cruise in the beautiful British summer. And with that comes the call to once again Check, Clean and Dry!

You may have already heard of the better known (INNS) Invasive Non Native Species such as the ‘Killer Shrimp’ or ‘New Zealand Pigmyweed’ but others such as ‘Carpet Sea Squirt’, ‘Wireweed’ and ‘Zebra Mussels’ have also been found in British waters. These species are not native to the British Isles and left unchecked can cause harm, effectively outcompeting, native UK species. They can also clog up waterways and affect water quality making navigation difficult, for example certain types of water primrose that can grow into thick carpets.

 

Killer shrimp
Killer shrimp

Check, Clean, Dry is the best way to protect both your stretch of water and others around the country from INNS. You may have taken your boat to a club or site already actively dealing with these problems and may therefore be well versed in the Check Clean Dry process. If you haven’t or even if you rarely take your boat away from your club, it is good advice to have all boats, checked, cleaned and dried before getting back on the water, especially in the wake of the high tides and major flooding.

When you Check Clean Dry it is more than just the boat, it is anything that may have had contact with the water and could possibly hide species, fragments, eggs or spores of an INNS – Killer Shrimp can lay up to 200 eggs per clutch and can spread rapidly! Thoroughly check and wash down the trailer and any launching trollies, particularly nooks and crannies such as tyre treads, and check, clean and dry sails, wetsuits and buoyancy aids. The drying stage is just as important as some species can survive in damp equipment and clothing for up to two weeks. It may seem like extra effort, but the pros outweigh the cons and will ensure you have a healthy stretch of water to sail on for many seasons to come.

Find out more about The Green Blue and get The Green Blue’s Aquatic Invaders poster

The clocks have changed, the weather is improving (we hope), Easter has come and gone and the sailing season lies ahead. Many of us are already planning what we are going to do and we are impatient to get on with it.

Now is a good time to think about the state of your safety equipment and in particular your life raft. Many of us invest a small fortune on one; we expect it to work without fail if needed and yet most of us leave it out on the weather deck or stuffed away in some locker without a second thought often for months on end – life rafts need love too!

Love your life raft

If you do not get your life raft serviced by someone who knows what they are doing and has been accredited by the manufacturer or you do not keep up with the manufacturers recommended servicing intervals, it might not do what you expect it to do and that is to sustain you until rescue arrives.

Not only is it important to ensure that life rafts are serviced at an Approved Service Station, it is also important that they are serviced at the appropriate interval as recommended by the manufacturer.

Life rafts may contain a number of items of survival equipment such as torches, flares, first aid kits, anti-seasickness pills, water and food that all have a shelf life and must be changed when they expire.

It is also vital that the inflation system has not leaked and still has enough gas to inflate the life raft and achieve working pressure.

It is worth remembering that valise-packed life rafts are prone to internal damage if they are moved about regularly or not stored properly and for that reason the MCA stipulates that they are serviced annually where carriage is mandatory.

Beware

I had a valise life raft once which I took for servicing and was astonished to find that the contents had turned to mush because nothing had been sealed in watertight packaging. The subsequent servicing by a well-known approved service agent was, I admit, expensive but it gave me the confidence that I could rely on it and furthermore, I knew what was in it.

Some time ago, the RNLI set off a life raft in their pool when testing hydrostatic releases, what came out were two tractor tyre inner tubes and a pile of house bricks to make up the weight! You do not need to find that out when abandoning ship!

Servicing

In the UK, the MCA requires inflatable life rafts, marine evacuation systems, inflatable lifejackets and hydrostatic release units carried on United Kingdom merchant ships, fishing vessels and small commercial vessels (including charter and RYA recognised training centre craft) to be regularly serviced at an Approved Service Station.

An Approved Service Station is one that has been formally accredited by the manufacturer of the equipment and has been approved by the MCA on behalf of the Secretary of State.

There is no such requirement for servicing of privately owned leisure inflatable life rafts; you are free to get it serviced when you like and by whom you like.

Although many service stations offer servicing for a wide range of life raft models, they may not be approved by the manufacturer to do the work. Be aware that any service work done by a non-approved service station could invalidate a life raft warranty.

Given that you might want it to save your life one day is it sensible to skip a service or use a non-approved service station? The answer is probably no.

The MCA provides further advice and Standards for the Conditions for the Approval of Service Stations for Small Craft Inflatable Liferafts which can be viewed here.

Stuart Carruthers, RYA Cruising Manager

There is no better place to be than on the water if you want to catch a glimpse of the UK’s amazing marine wildlife. But it is important to be aware that anyone caught disturbing wildlife can now be prosecuted. Recent changes to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 Amended, provide increased protection for wildlife.

Ignorance is no excuse

Ignorance of the law is no excuse, as shown by a recent case of two skippers whose actions were linked to the death of a juvenile inshore bottlenose dolphin in the Camel Estuary, near Padstow in July 2013. The skippers admitted reckless disturbance which, under the Act carries a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or a £5,000 fine.

In this instance, the skippers were dealt with by ‘restorative justice’ and forced to complete a Wildlife Safe (WiSe) course on how to view marine wildlife safely, responsibly and within the law.

Protect and enjoy

Appreciating our marine wildlife is part of the pleasure of taking to the water but it is important to know what to do when you encounter wildlife to stay on the right side of the law and enjoy the experience.

The Green Marine Wildlife Guide, a digital guide for iPad and iPhone, provides interactive touch based illustrations of marine wildlife together with an interactive map of the UK revealing what marine wildlife we can expect to see around the coast through the year.

For instance, from May onwards the gentle giant of the basking shark can be seen in waters off the UK’s south west coast as they head up north for their annual migration. Whilst in the North East grey seals are a common sighting.

Top tips

The guide provides a series of top tips for spotting marine wildlife and importantly guidance on how to avoid disturbing or hurting them.

Clear guidelines help with what to do if you see a marine animal including advice on how much time you should spend near the animals and how much clearance you should give them.

The golden rule when watching marine wildlife is to be aware of any change in their behaviour which may signify disturbance.

To explore the digital edition of the Green Marine Wildlife Guide, download the free ‘RYA Books’ app from iTunes and touch the ‘Catalogues & Brochures’ to find the Guide.

The Green Blue is the environment initiative of the RYA (Royal Yachting Association) and the BMF (British Marine Federation). Visit The Green Blue website.

Bottlenose dolphin image: Charlie Phillips